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Airfoils, Ordinates, Fat Wings, Harry Riblett and other musings…

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  • #31
    What Jared said...

    While this discussion has been educational, we aren't building an SR-71 or an F-104. In fact, our VNE is lower than the stall speed of both of those :-)

    Also, keep in mind that many of us are scratch building and are hammering our ribs out over a wooden template: there is no way in, well.... you know, that all of our ribs are *exactly* the same as the kit ribs. I would argue that not all of the ribs in a wing are *exactly* the same, although you probably can't tell that by eye. The kit ribs, however, are as close to perfection as you can get WRT the plans/mylar template.

    There are many Bearhawks happily speeding and STOLing around and they couldn't care less about a line width on the plans here or there. The airplanes are wonderful to fly, have great performance, and have no nasty gotchas.

    By all means, carry on with the academic discussions (I'll admit my eyes glazed over a bit after a while...I'm a software guy...) but for those that are concerned/confused, don't be. Bob knows what he is doing and designing. The proof is in the flying (both scratch and kit built) and there is a LOT of proof out there....

    My $0.02
    -------------------
    Mark

    Maule M5-235C C-GJFK
    4 Seat Bearhawk #1078 (Scratch building)
    RV-8 C-GURV (Sold)

    Comment


    • Frank
      Frank commented
      Editing a comment
      Factory nose ribs (LSA) are different from scratch built ribs in an important way. The former have a flange all the way around the nose while the latter do not. In fact, scratch noses get trimmed (LSA) while factory noses do not - or am I wrong?

    • rv8bldr
      rv8bldr commented
      Editing a comment
      Sorry, Frank, I can't answer that question as I am scratch building 4pl A model. I don't think I've even seen an LSA is the flesh. I'm sure someone will be able to answer it for you. The point I was trying to make was to not get all wrapped around the axle about the minor differences between the "book" and the plans on these type of aircraft. Unless you are Bob Hoover or some other highly qualified and experienced test pilot you aren't going to be able to tell the difference. And even then....

    • stinger
      stinger commented
      Editing a comment
      I did not cut my nose ribs , I wrapped Duck tape around the tip two layers . I think it turned out well. Yes wing ribs may be different however my LAS fly's quite good .I have 21" tires, Cont. 0200 with a top speed of 135 mph at red line of 2750 rpm. Cruise 2450 rpm around 110mph. Stinger

  • #32
    Originally posted by rv8bldr View Post
    What Jared said...

    While this discussion has been educational, we aren't building an SR-71 or an F-104. In fact, our VNE is lower than the stall speed of both of those :-)

    Also, keep in mind that many of us are scratch building and are hammering our ribs out over a wooden template: there is no way in, well.... you know, that all of our ribs are *exactly* the same as the kit ribs. I would argue that not all of the ribs in a wing are *exactly* the same, although you probably can't tell that by eye. The kit ribs, however, are as close to perfection as you can get WRT the plans/mylar template.

    There are many Bearhawks happily speeding and STOLing around and they couldn't care less about a line width on the plans here or there. The airplanes are wonderful to fly, have great performance, and have no nasty gotchas.

    By all means, carry on with the academic discussions (I'll admit my eyes glazed over a bit after a while...I'm a software guy...) but for those that are concerned/confused, don't be. Bob knows what he is doing and designing. The proof is in the flying (both scratch and kit built) and there is a LOT of proof out there....

    My $0.02
    Hear, hear. I do NOT want to steer anyone away from the plans. I was about to start forming my aileron spar web prior to my inadvertent shop "closure," and the plans very clearly say "check for fit with rib" right next to the dimensioned spar height. In order to fit my aileron ribs (without joggling - another religious argument that I won't dive into), my aileron spar web needs to be about 0.1" taller than the dimension showed in the plans. Lack of joggling will only account for half of that variation. Yet, when I lay my ribs on my formblock and compare to the Mylar, they look pretty darn close to me. I guess I went a little more to the outside of the line. I'm not sweating it. When my build comes in heavy, this will be one of the 1000 reasons.

    But seriously, a software guy? That's where all the problems originate! (*Ducks shoe thrown in my general direction.*)

    Nick
    4-Place Model 'B' Serial 1529B (with many years to go...)

    Comment


    • #33
      Originally posted by nborer View Post

      Stuff deleted....

      But seriously, a software guy? That's where all the problems originate! (*Ducks shoe thrown in my general direction.*)

      Nick
      At one time them would have been fightin' words.... However, I'm less than 2 years from pulling the plug on working for a living so I find that aspersions don't stick anymore.

      -------------------
      Mark

      Maule M5-235C C-GJFK
      4 Seat Bearhawk #1078 (Scratch building)
      RV-8 C-GURV (Sold)

      Comment


      • nborer
        nborer commented
        Editing a comment
        Said in jest, of course. My brother is a software engineer, so we've been trading barbs for the last several decades.

      • rv8bldr
        rv8bldr commented
        Editing a comment
        And it was taken in jest, Nick :-) No worries....
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