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Bearhawk Patrol Project For Sale - Tennessee

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  • Bearhawk Patrol Project For Sale - Tennessee

    Posting this from an email received today on the old BH group:

    April 2, 2019

    My husband , Richard Porter purchased a Bearhawk kit several years ago. He enjoyed the time he spent working on his airplane. In 2015 he started feeling ill. Finally after 3 doctors and 9 months later he suffered thru 36 radiation and 6 chemo treatments. He had cancer of the larynx. He was in remission for 8 months and in Sept 1, the cancer returned to his liver and in three weeks he was gone. (Sept 26) Needless to say I miss him so very much.

    I was hoping that one of you could help sell his kit. Tell me what I should do as far as pictures and price. In dollars he has $ 23,000.00, could be more. As I only found the invoices for this amount. I really need some advice. Please help me.

    I have talked to Mr. Barrows and Mark Goldberg, when they would call for Rich. I do not know the rest of you but if you can help in any way I would be forever grateful. I promise I will be very reasonable in selling price.

    I live in the country and my son and friends are encouraging me to move into town so I will have to sell in the next 4-5 months.

    Thank You so very much .

    Nancy Porter
    4008 McCrary Rd.
    Lebanon, Tennessee 37090

    615-449-7386 (h) 615-556-8092 (c)


  • #2
    So Sorry to hear about your loss, Hope you get it sold fast.

    Comment


    • #3
      She contacted me also. Looking back at the records - it looks like he bought a Patrol Basic fuselage and some other parts. I requested pictures so I could help her determine what she has and how much work was done. But in a situation like this, it would be very nice if someone took the project off her hands for a fair price. Mark

      Comment


      • #4
        If I were in the market for a patrol kit I would buy it. But Im committed to my LSA. I hope who ever buys it does not try to take advantage of the situation, I know it sounds bad but unfortunately there are people out there like that I just hope there are none like that on this forum. I cant imagine there are.

        Comment


        • #6
          Oh my, I wish I had seen this sooner. I just spent two weeks in Lebanon, would have been happy to take a closer look.

          Comment


          • #7
            I talked to the Lady about the patrol . Her husband had a welding shop do the welding as it was not a completely welded frame. She gave me the phone number of the welding shop so I called them to find out how it was welded, the gentleman said he Mig welded the fittings on it . I beleave Bob wants them gas welded on . Any input would be appreciated. Thanks

            Comment


            • #8
              I talked to her as well. After very careful scrutiny of the pictures, it appeared that a couple of them featured Vans Rv parts. (2nd from beginning and second from end in the photo set). The fuselage would have been welded at the factory except the standoffs for the stringers and other small bits I think. I assumed the welding had been done by the builder, and as I don’t know enough about welding to ask, I didn’t. Good on you for making sure it’s ok. It would be a shame to have expertly welded clusters and then have a tube weakened by improper welding between joints.

              The only work done on the wings seems to be the flaps and ailerons, which oddly were not corrosion proofed inside prior to final assembly. There are ribs, spars, fuel tanks, and struts in evidence, but not much else.

              We were not able to reconcile the amount of the receipts she has with what the photos show, but perhaps one could do so by taking careful inventory in person. Maybe there are brakes and tires, or tailwheeel assemblies, sheet metal, etc. I’m kind of far away, so it doesn’t look like it will work for me since the commitment to travel and view the project, then bring it home is significant. I hope this helps someone make an informed decision.

              The exercise has made me more comfortable with following my original plan, which is to buy the most complete patrol kit I can (in two stages-wings and fuse) Walking before running, so to speak and starting in an organized fashion with clean factory stuff will probably work best for someone like me who is new to building. For the right builder, it could work out well, and I’m sure the project is an unwanted burden to this lady.

              Comment


              • Mark Goldberg
                Mark Goldberg commented
                Editing a comment
                We are glad to help when the time is right Mr. Pbruce. Mark

            • #9
              Originally posted by Stolguy View Post
              I talked to the Lady about the patrol . Her husband had a welding shop do the welding as it was not a completely welded frame. She gave me the phone number of the welding shop so I called them to find out how it was welded, the gentleman said he Mig welded the fittings on it . I beleave Bob wants them gas welded on . Any input would be appreciated. Thanks
              Generally you don't mig 4130. TIG or oxy acetylene only. Mig needs to be pre heated, tig can use it to but puts a lot less heat into the material. Oxy is preferred.
              I probably would not consider a mig fuselage for anything but scrap.

              Comment


              • #10
                MIG is a perfectly acceptable method as long as it is done by a professional with experience...and by experience I'm not talking about making farm implements or repairing mufflers. American Champion and Maule MIG their fuselages, but it is done by skilled people trained in the process. Here's a thread that explains it a bit further, and of course always brings up discussion: http://eaaforums.org/showthread.php?...130-fuse/page2

                As a general statement, I would say the majority of people on this forum do not have the welding skills to MIG an aircraft structure. On the other hand, saying that anything MIG welded should be regarded as scrap is a bit much.
                Last edited by alaskabearhawk; 05-13-2019, 02:57 PM.

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by alaskabearhawk View Post
                  MIG is a perfectly acceptable method as long as it is done by a professional with experience...and by experience I'm not talking about making farm implements or repairing mufflers. American Champion and Maule MIG their fuselages, but it is done by skilled people trained in the process. Here's a thread that explains it a bit further, and of course always brings up discussion: http://eaaforums.org/showthread.php?...130-fuse/page2

                  As a general statement, I would say the majority of people on this forum do not have the welding skills to MIG an aircraft structure. On the other hand, saying that anything MIG welded should be regarded as scrap is a bit much.
                  If all that was MIG welded was tabs and stringer standoffs I wouldn't have any concern at all. If landing gear and wing attach fittings etc were MIG welded I would want a qualified aircraft welding inspector take a look at them unless it was an aircraft welder that did the MIG work.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Ever time one of these post about welding gets posted, everyone throws in there two cents. We are not talking mig in general we are talking about the work done on this frame. This was just a farm blacksmith shop that mig welded the fittings . No post heat No preheat. . Not aircraft welder type people. I am sure the welds look nice but could be a problem, I even went as far as calling Randy Schitter at Rans aircraft in Hays Kansas . He told me they mig there frames . BUT they have the rite welder and Heat and wire OD for the job. No It is not just a mig weld job. He said aircraft tube is super thing way easyer to stress around the weld than something like a race car frame.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by alaskabearhawk View Post
                      MIG is a perfectly acceptable method as long as it is done by a professional with experience...and by experience I'm not talking about making farm implements or repairing mufflers. American Champion and Maule MIG their fuselages, but it is done by skilled people trained in the process. Here's a thread that explains it a bit further, and of course always brings up discussion: http://eaaforums.org/showthread.php?...130-fuse/page2

                      As a general statement, I would say the majority of people on this forum do not have the welding skills to MIG an aircraft structure. On the other hand, saying that anything MIG welded should be regarded as scrap is a bit much.
                      The reason I have that feeling is because the only way I'd get into a homebuilt with a MIG welded frame would be if the factory did it or I personally knew the welder and their ability. If I was a perspective buyer of a completed homebuilt and you told me/I saw the frame was MIG welded(and again that wasn't the factory), I wouldn't touch it with a 10ft pole for fear it'd kill me. No resale value at all.

                      The fact that Mark has the fuselages O/A welded is a big selling point to me.

                      Comment


                      • Mark Goldberg
                        Mark Goldberg commented
                        Editing a comment
                        That is what Bob wanted. He prefers O/A welding of 4130 to other processes. Mark
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