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Breaking In New Brakes

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  • Breaking In New Brakes

    My Cleveland brakes had both pads and discs that were worn past their service limits, so new ones of both were installed. I found that braking was pretty poor afterward compared to what even my worn ones were providing. I learned after that there is a break-in procedure for new brakes. After the break-in process, everything is working fine. It was also suggested by another that you need to be sure that new discs are cleaned with an appropriate solvent before use to remove the factory corrosion coating.

    From the service guide:

    http://www.parker.com/literature/Aircra ... SG0001.pdf

    Guide AWBTSG0001-18/USA p.2

    A. Conditioning Procedures
    When new linings have been installed, it is important to condition them properly to obtain the service life designed into them. The metallic and organic linings have different operating characteristics. Separate conditioning procedures are given for metallic and organic linings.

    ORGANIC LININGS
    1. Taxi aircraft for 1500 feet with engine at 1700 rpm applying brake pedal force as needed to develop a 5-10 mph taxi speed.
    2. Allow the brakes to cool for 10 to 15 minutes.
    3. Apply brakes and check for restraint at high static throttle. If brakes hold, conditioning is complete.
    4. If brakes cannot hold aircraft during static run-up, allow brakes to completely cool and repeat steps 1 through 3.

    METALLIC LININGS
    1. Perform two (2) consecutive full stop braking applications from 30 to 35 knots. Do not allow the brake discs to cool substantially between
    the stops.
    2. Allow the brakes to cool for 10 to 15 minutes.
    3. Apply brakes and check for restraint at high static throttle. If brakes hold, conditioning is complete.
    4. If brakes cannot hold aircraft during static run-up, allow brakes to cool completely and repeat steps 1 through 3.

    These conditioning procedures will wear off high spots and generate sufficient heat to create a thin layer of glazed material at the lining friction surface. Normal brake usage should generate enough heat to maintain the glaze throughout the life of the lining. Properly conditioned linings will provide many hours of maintenance free service. A visual inspection of the brake disc will indicate the lining condition. A smooth surface, one without grooves, indicates the linings are properly glazed. If the disc is rough (grooved), the linings must be reglazed. The conditioning procedure should be performed whenever the rough disc condition is observed. Light use, such as in taxiing, will cause the glaze to be worn rapidly and reduce the designed service life of the linings and discs.
    Last edited by Chris In Milwaukee; 07-18-2018, 10:15 AM.
    ​Christopher Owens, EAA #808438
    Project "Expedition"
    Bearhawk 4-Place Scratch Built, Plans #991
    Bearhawk Patrol Scratch Built, Plans #P313
    Germantown, Wisconsin, USA
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