Bearhawk Aircraft Bearhawk Tailwheels LLC Eric Newton's Builder Manuals Bearhawk Plans Bearhawk Store

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stubby Gas Lens and TIG Fingers

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stubby Gas Lens and TIG Fingers

    Picked up a couple of accessories for my TIG setup based on recommendations from a few different folks.

    The Stubby Gas Lens fits my stock #17 flex torch and allows tighter fits in small places using a gas lens. That should be handy. Maybe even better if I invest in a #9 torch.

    The TIG Finger is a high-temp sleeve you can slip over one or more fingers that allows you to rest your torch hand closer to the work with less likelihood of getting burned, and keep the torch steady. I know that Paul Minelga is a fan of this one. Looking forward to giving it a go.



    ​Christopher Owens, EAA #808438
    Project "Expedition"
    Bearhawk 4-Place Scratch Built, Plans #991
    Bearhawk Patrol Scratch Built, Plans #P313
    Germantown, Wisconsin, USA

  • #2
    I've become a gas lens whore... for some reason I love the various combinations. I recently cracked my CK Pyrex Gas Saver so I replaced it with a Furick BBW. I did recently learn that normal collet bodies and small cups are preferred for aluminum welding.

    Comment


    • #3
      Chris-
      I have a 20 size water cooled torch. Plenty big -- i can do 200 amps without much heat buildup. (just remember to turn on the water :-) )
      Have found that the gas lens seems to work better than regular everywhere except on inside corners, have found on inside corners -- since the cup is
      larger in diameter you cant get the end of the cup down into the corner as close--- and having the end of the cup further back from the joint seems to
      cause air to be entrained into the argon stream. - which results in a dirty start and sometimes a melt-through before a puddle is started. (due to oxidation)
      To solve it I switch to a regular style cup - and I use the smallest diameter one i have so I can get the end of the cup very close to the 90 degree joint.
      That seems to help get a clean start (and a clean pretty bead thereafter)

      The gas lens seems to work better for flat or outside corner. especially on aluminum.

      Tim


      Comment


      • #4
        Once I get my shop re-established (hopefully starting after T'giving), I'm going to cut a few chunks off of my 5052 sheet (or maybe find some scrap at a local metal shop), and start building cubes for practice. That should get me semi-prepared for fuel tank construction.

        The concept (Googled this image):

        15259091_223535104737607_1327325497838796800_n.jpg?ig_cache_key=MTQwMjQyOTgwNDgzNDYzODQzMA%3D%3D.2.jpg

        Speaking of 90-degree joints, I see a lot of videos where people are almost laying the cup sideways instead of the oft-dictated 15 degrees. Do those of you who are experienced welders do the same, or is this just for purposes of filming? The visibility sure is better. I imagine with a smaller cup really wedged into the corner, gas flow is less of an issue as it pushes out across the working area.
        ​Christopher Owens, EAA #808438
        Project "Expedition"
        Bearhawk 4-Place Scratch Built, Plans #991
        Bearhawk Patrol Scratch Built, Plans #P313
        Germantown, Wisconsin, USA

        Comment


        • #5
          I want a rotater. Any ideas on a cheapish setup using a cordless drill?

          Comment


          • #6
            I have made a lot of tanks over the last 45 years. Many fuel tanks but mostly oil tanks for race cars. I started my welding career by gas welding aluminum.

            Who ever welded that cube has a really good hand.

            The one thing I did for my fuel tanks on the 4 place Bearhawk was form the tank so that all the welds were butt welds. All the joints were flanged 45 degrees. This helped reduce the distortion that I felt would be a problem if I built the tanks as they were designed. I did make fixtures to hold the tank square as I was tacking it together.

            Comment


            • #7
              This is the most inspiring (and relaxing) thing you'll watch this week:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPtNTGW4Xmw


              Here's my new Furick BBW on my CK9. I love this tiny torch. 125A max though.

              23279544_1747243538913376_7957168317389602816_n.jpg
              Last edited by Zzz; 11-23-2017, 12:39 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Chris---
                I have found laying the torch down any past 20 degrees- is kind of defeating the purpose of what you are trying to do---
                (heat the work ahead of the puddle-) and more so- on an inside corner it can suck outside air in and you instantly have a contaminated puddle - and sometimes soot.
                If you see soot when you are starting or your tungsten gets blue on the end--- your gas coverage is failing. I like to have torch at 90 degrees for the start most times on inside corner.
                Where I may lay the torch down flat is if I have to weld on the edge of a butt weld. Like a tack or a repair from a bad start.

                A good exercise on aluminum---- cut bunch of cupons about 1 by 3 inches. (1/8 thick)
                fit them up for a butt weld. Tack the lateral edges on both ends. Then experiment putting a bead down it on one side. Then inspect the back side and note the current and travel speed you used. Then grab it in the vice and hit it with a hammer trying to "un-fold" the joint. After it opens - note how far (or not far) the weld penetrated.
                Keep increasing the current and each time note how the back side looks. At some point you will see the back start to melt a little along the seam. A little more current and you
                will see an almost 2-nd bead forming on the back. It will look dirtier than the front one- then you are hot enough- Do the hammer test on each one to see the penetration
                and how it wetted the inside of the joint.

                If you find the cupons get too hot and the heat is running away- make your plates bigger-- maybe 2 by 6 inches. When you are doing aluminum- you get a nicer weld
                generally if you can move along fairly briskly. say an inch in about 2 sec. (a little faster as you get better) If you linger too long and go too slow the whole cupon gets hot all over.
                Thats why you weld fast. You sort of have to outrun the thermal conductivity of the material.

                These outside welds in the cube and in the tank video--- those are super easy to do..... easiest weld to do in aluminum. ( I think) (gas lens shines there too ! )
                you will be so satisfied how quick you can do that weld pretty !
                Also - it really helps the plates to "wet" together easily if you file and almost polish the edges so they are mirror smooth. If there are grooves and scratches on the edges
                - then dirt hides in there and makes your puddle want to fight you --- it resists zippering closed like you want to see when its NICE and CLEAN. When its clean it just jumps
                together all by its self--- you just add filler to it.

                It IS very habit forming and greatly satisfying to practice.

                Tim


                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zzz View Post
                  This is the most inspiring (and relaxing) thing you'll watch this week:

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPtNTGW4Xmw
                  You were right
                  ​Christopher Owens, EAA #808438
                  Project "Expedition"
                  Bearhawk 4-Place Scratch Built, Plans #991
                  Bearhawk Patrol Scratch Built, Plans #P313
                  Germantown, Wisconsin, USA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fairchild View Post

                    It IS very habit forming and greatly satisfying to practice.

                    Tim
                    Thanks so much for your guidance and experience. Looking forward to the adventure!
                    ​Christopher Owens, EAA #808438
                    Project "Expedition"
                    Bearhawk 4-Place Scratch Built, Plans #991
                    Bearhawk Patrol Scratch Built, Plans #P313
                    Germantown, Wisconsin, USA

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X