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Bearhawk in the backcountry

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  • Bearhawk in the backcountry

    Here are some photos from the trip we took in the weekend. We took the Bearhawk into one of the smaller local ranges for a hunting trip. North Island, New Zealand.

    Flying in toward the hills:


    Passing a local airstrip on the way:


    On the ground in the valley, the airstrip is well maintained, but has a few bumps and a rain-gutter on one side:


    A view of the shallow valley the airstrip sits in, elevation 3,100ft:



  • #2
    Continues...

    Leaving the plane tied down to go hunting overnight:



    Here are some photos from the hunt itself. We were looking for Sika deer, and did see a very good stag in velvet, but we decided to leave him to grow a while longer.

    Taking a look around:


    Spotted the stag in the very top of a little valley at last light, and evaluating our next move:

    Comment


    • Robert440
      Robert440 commented
      Editing a comment
      If that's a Remington 700 made around 2006 or later and has the Mark X trigger they are under a recall for faulty triggers! Beware and check Remingtons recall website. Mine has been sitting at the factory for a month and a half now!

    • Battson
      Battson commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the warning Robert.
      I always refit my rifles with Timney triggers, so it doesn't apply to me. I can't shoot as well with the coarse factory trigger.

  • #3
    Excellent motivation for us not flying yet! Keep it coming and thanks for posting. Maybe I missed it, but why don't we have a picture thread or trip thread? Cheers, Andy

    Comment


    • #4
      wow. great pictures! very motivating!

      Comment


      • #5
        Great photos - thanks for sharing they make for great motivation! Mike BearHawk #1250 KLXT
        Mike Nault
        BH #1250
        KLXT

        Comment


        • #6
          Awesome! ...did you bring anything home? -- Bearhawk

          Comment


          • #7
            We decided to leave the stag to grow a week or two more, once his velvet has hardened he's on the menu - if we can find him again!
            We will be back...

            We're just in the throes of planning a much larger mission for this weekend (3 days, several tanks of fuel, more hunting, fishing & outdoors). Watch this space.

            Comment


            • Bradrock
              Bradrock commented
              Editing a comment
              Nice pics of our back yard Jono! Are you part of the new Backcountry group?

            • Battson
              Battson commented
              Editing a comment
              Hey Brad - yep, I got issued the first interim membership! Off to the Haast area tomorrow night to exercise it a bit further! It's called the Recreational Back Country Pilot's Association.

              The full memberships will become available at the STOL comp in Omaka, although Boyd is the only NI strip so far - we are working on others - so you have to be prepared to fly south. That suits me anyway, as I grew up down there and know all the spots already.
              Last edited by Battson; 01-15-2014, 04:54 PM.

          • #8
            Another interesting point which I forgot to mention:

            On the way home we had to fly though to some severe turbulence to remain VFR and enter the control zone. I had to landed with 15G20kts crosswind - stressful way to finish the day. Upon putting the tail on the ground, once we'd slowed to walking pace, I found I had lost tailwheel steering in both directions. No problem, lean on the brakes to steer.... The tailwheel chains had been shaken free by the turbulence(!), the spring clips had actually been undone (somehow??). The chains are a good length - just a hint of slack. I need to oppose the rudder and tailwheel to get enough slack to unclip the chains on the ground. So I can only surmise the turbulence was making the tailwheel flop around quite a lot in flight.

            Anyway, I was very happy that I elected to use proper crosswind technique. Had I three-pointed in and relied on tailwheel steering, it could have been more excitement than I bargained for.

            Comment


            • #9
              We've been having fun tripping around the country. Here are a few more snaps:

              At the beach on the East coast


              Visiting a Station down south.


              Spent a few hours flying some of our favourite valleys. Stopped here to stretch our legs.


              Flying home Controlled VFR between cloud layers at 11,000. We had to speed back to beat Cyclone June to our home base, so making 150KTAS was helpful!


              We have more on the other camera, I'll post some more scenic shots later if any turned out well.

              Comment


              • #10
                Absolutely gorgeous!

                Comment


                • #11
                  Here are some more from the last weekend:

                  Mt. Cook (NZ's highest peak) and Tasman Lake from 9,500ft


                  The back of Glentanner sheep station, and Lake Pukaki


                  The Hopkins, one of NZs many many braided rivers.


                  The Bearhawk parked on a friend's front lawn - one of the best private airstrip properties in NZ I reckon!!

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Franz Joseph Glacier


                    An aerial view of the Landsborough river meeting the Haast river, at Clarke's Bluff


                    Another angle on the ground in the Landsborough valley


                    The Wilkin Valley, with Mt. Aeolus at it's forks. A place of significance for my family.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      And here's Fox Glacier


                      And the much smaller Snow White Glacier (or what remains of it) falling from Mt Maoriri, at the very head of the Arawhata River.


                      And one last photo in the long grass, for good measure.

                      Comment


                      • Bradrock
                        Bradrock commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Seriously Jono, I'm jealous already! But your pics are certainly making me spend more time in the garage. If you're likely to stop in Taupo, please let me know. Or if I can come and play sometime I'll fly down there.
                        I'm really enjoying the scratch building process but am painfully aware of how long it will take.

                      • Battson
                        Battson commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Hey Brad,

                        If I can get time I am likely to pop through Taupo soon enough.... I'll send you a txt if I have enough daylight to stop by.

                        Coming home from Ruapehu Saturday evening, I was pushed for time against ECT-30 and chose to "open her up" for a change - we didn't lose any speed for the VGs, that's for sure. Making 150 KTAS makes you smile, from a plane that lands at less than 35KIAS.

                    • #14
                      Outstanding country! :-)

                      Comment


                      • #15
                        Originally posted by Battson View Post
                        Another interesting point which I forgot to mention: On the way home we had to fly though to some severe turbulence to remain VFR and enter the control zone. I had to landed with 15G20kts crosswind - stressful way to finish the day. Upon putting the tail on the ground, once we'd slowed to walking pace, I found I had lost tailwheel steering in both directions. No problem, lean on the brakes to steer.... The tailwheel chains had been shaken free by the turbulence(!), the spring clips had actually been undone (somehow??). The chains are a good length - just a hint of slack. I need to oppose the rudder and tailwheel to get enough slack to unclip the chains on the ground. So I can only surmise the turbulence was making the tailwheel flop around quite a lot in flight. Anyway, I was very happy that I elected to use proper crosswind technique. Had I three-pointed in and relied on tailwheel steering, it could have been more excitement than I bargained for.
                        I always safety wire those clips, I have seen them come loose on more than one airplane. People at my airport laugh at me and say "I don't see any reason to safety those, I don't see how they could ever come off.". Well, I have seen it a few times now. Beautiful pictures by the way. What a great trip report, very motivational. Thanks so much for sharing.
                        Eric Newton - Long Beach, MS
                        Bearhawk Tailwheels and Builder's Manuals
                        http://bhtailwheels.com
                        http://mybearhawk.com/buildermanual.html

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