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VFR Chart Wilderness Areas and backcountry flying

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  • VFR Chart Wilderness Areas and backcountry flying

    As I set up my shop for my newly purchased 4 place plans, I visit local airports to see whats flying and try to find more tail wheel pilots, watch building videos and watch a lot of backcountry flying videos. The adventure aspect of flying has drawn many of us to the Bearhawk with its obvious bush access. My question is, how do so many people fly low and slow or even touch down in the backcountry when so much of it is protected? I understand BLM land and its appeal through my random road trips that include free camping in such areas. But as I look at Pacific Northwest sectionals, there is a lot more land protected at higher levels with the little blue line and dots surrounding it. I am having a hard time finding exactly what is "recommended" and what is the law on the topic. Perhaps some of you that are flying, specifically the ones doing backcountry flying like camping trips in the mountains, gravel bar landings and other off airport excursions could help shed some light on the topic.

  • #2
    "Pilots are requested to avoid flight below 1000' AGL....."

    Bold for emphasis.

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    • #3
      I wouldn't mess around with wilderness areas. Same for National Parks. They take that stuff pretty seriously. As for else where, I have always felt like I'm sneaking in and have always had concern for leaving the plane for an extended period while going off exploring, worried that someone would report it to someone who would be upset about it. That said, I've still managed to have incredible adventures off airport and when you get started you may find there are plenty interesting unmarked or abandoned runways to keep you busy for a while. The RAF is doing a good job getting the land owners i.e. BLM and Forest Service to lighten up a little.

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      • svyolo
        svyolo commented
        Editing a comment
        The land does belong to us, after all.

    • #4
      Originally posted by Pat Fagan View Post
      I wouldn't mess around with wilderness areas. Same for National Parks. They take that stuff pretty seriously. As for else where, I have always felt like I'm sneaking in and have always had concern for leaving the plane for an extended period while going off exploring, worried that someone would report it to someone who would be upset about it. That said, I've still managed to have incredible adventures off airport and when you get started you may find there are plenty interesting unmarked or abandoned runways to keep you busy for a while. The RAF is doing a good job getting the land owners i.e. BLM and Forest Service to lighten up a little.
      When’s your next trip to Idaho Pat?
      I'm a Tapatalk user so I can't see your "comment"

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      • #5
        No plans for Idaho this year. Summer and fall are shaping up to be pretty busy with other activities. We are contemplating a trip to OSH though. Focus of this years event is fire fighting so it seems appropriate that smokey attend.

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        • #6
          I believe you meant to say 2000 feet above. Here are two references...neither in the FARs

          http://www.faraim.org/aim/aim-4-03-14-514.html

          https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/...r/AC91-36d.pdf

          "The landing of aircraft is prohibited on lands or waters administered by the National Park Service,
          U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or U.S. Forest Service without authorization from the respective agency"

          The AIM and ACs are not regulatory, but the FAA also likes that catch phrase "careless and reckless"



          Scott Ahrens
          Bearhawk Patrol Plans Built
          #254

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