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To prime or not to prime

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  • To prime or not to prime

    Looking for opinions regarding priming the flaps and ailerons. It might be possible to get access to the interior of the structures to fog in some corrosion proofing after covering through the end ribs. No primer means less weight to balance out on the ailerons. I've been spraying primer on endless wing parts for the last week and am completely burned out. Stits epoxy primer is bad news even spraying it outside with all the safety gear. Glad I did it but I can't recommend it. I'll suck it up and prime them if most who respond feel its for the best but the corrosion proofing worked good on my Cessna. It had no primer on the interior of the wings whatsoever. What about just priming the fay surfaces? My outdoor priming days are over in Seattle for this year, today was it, the rain starts tomorrow. Thanks in advance for any insight. Also my wing steel needs corrosion proofing. Powdercoat or primer?
    Cheers
    Gerry
    Patrol #30

  • #2
    Wing steel - primer and top coat. If you are corrosion proofing the rest of your wings - it would seem that doing something on the ailerons/flaps would be good idea. As I recall - you are up near Seattle in sea/salty air. More reason to protect for the long term. Mark

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    • #3
      I like this 2 part epoxy primer for the priming. Easy to use. Use a respirator mask in a well retaliated area.
      https://www.spraymax.com/en-us/produ...poxy-primer-1/
      Brooks Cone
      Southeast Michigan
      Patrol #303, Kit build

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      • #4
        Hi Guys,

        I've got a follow up question - my wings are already primed from factory, but does everyone spray corrosion preventive compound (so-sure, CRC 3-36, LPS2, etc) inside their wings? It'll mean everything sticks to the surface, and adds a bit of weight, and run out all the little gaps around the inspection panels.

        To be honest, I've got no idea, because I only work on helicopters, and we spray that stuff everywhere. And it runs out everywhere.

        I won't be parking my plane next to the sea every day, but I do plan on the odd beach landing :-)

        Thanks,

        James

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        • #5
          I would say no. The factory process should be adequate. Boeing added an additional spray on protective coating on the sidewalls and bilge structure of the body sections below the floor beams because galleys and lavs leak. Also many airlines particularly in Africa carry livestock in the cargo hold. Animal urine will rot out the bottom of an airplane no matter how you protect it.
          Gerry
          Patrol #30

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          • #6
            Well then, we'll need another warning placard on the instrument panel:

            "NO LIVESTOCK TO BE CARRIED IN THIS AIRCRAFT."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by James View Post
              Hi Guys,

              I've got a follow up question - my wings are already primed from factory, but does everyone spray corrosion preventive compound (so-sure, CRC 3-36, LPS2, etc) inside their wings? It'll mean everything sticks to the surface, and adds a bit of weight, and run out all the little gaps around the inspection panels.

              To be honest, I've got no idea, because I only work on helicopters, and we spray that stuff everywhere. And it runs out everywhere.

              I won't be parking my plane next to the sea every day, but I do plan on the odd beach landing :-)

              Thanks,

              James
              If the environment you live in is anything like Florida, I'd probably start using ACF-50(or your anti corrosion of choice) at the first annual. I don't trust a Florida plane that isn't pissing that stuff out everywhere.

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              • #8
                When I called Bob... I asked him about priming on his Bearhawk prototype... he only primed the spars.. we didn’t get into more then that on that topic....as Mark mentioned above the wing steel should be primed and then location considerations
                Last edited by way_up_north; 10-24-2019, 12:01 PM.

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                • #9
                  For what its worth, I was able to finish priming the rest of my spar parts when the weather unexpectedly cooperated with warm temps and moderate humidity. I have used an airbrush throughout and am pleased with the results. I got good coverage without the coating being too thick. In total I used about 80% of a quart of Polyfiber EP 420/430 epoxy primer to paint the 250 or so spar parts which includes the rib attach angles. I also used about 1 and 1/2 quarts of Alumiprep 33 and about 2 qts of Alodyne 1201. I probably threw away about 25 percent of the primer I mixed because I primed in stages, 20 to 50 parts at a time depending on part size. It was hard for me to estimate how much to mix and I always mixed too much. I got a lot better as I progressed. I used new Alumiprep and Alodyne for each session. On the subject of airbrushes, stay away fron Paasche, I bought it because it was expensive and I thought more expensive means better. Its like keeping a Fiat running. When its on its great, but its a lot of work. I'm really happy with the results but it was more work then it should have been. Look at Badger. For me, a detail size gun would have been too much for the multitude of small parts and I probably would have wasted even more expensive paint.
                  Gerry
                  Patrol #30

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