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Baggage Bulkhead Idea

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  • Baggage Bulkhead Idea

    I found some polycarbonate roof panel material at McMaster-Carr (see https://www.mcmaster.com/85795K227/). I'm thinking this might be good material for my baggage bulkhead. 1/16" thick so I'm thinking it can't be that heavy and with the corrugations, I'm thinking it's pretty strong. I'm still considering all the usual materials but this has me interested. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    ABS Plastic works well too. https://www.ebay.com/itm/15449312438...oAAOSwrT1gx3u7

    I bet Nev will use Kydex!
    Rob Caldwell
    Lake Norman Airpark (14A), North Carolina
    EAA Chapter 309
    Model B Quick Build Kit Serial # 11B-24B / 25B
    YouTube Channel: http://bearhawklife.video
    1st Flight May 18, 2021

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    • Mark Dickens
      Mark Dickens commented
      Editing a comment
      That's pretty cool.

  • #3
    I think I have posted weights on here before for 5052 Al and fiberglass painted / unpainted on here before, painted they are both about the same.

    I would love to see the weights for this product and Kydex
    Last edited by Battson; 06-29-2021, 06:03 PM.

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    • #4
      I am using 1 layer of Kevlar (because I have it) but fiberglass is just as good. If you have neither I think A layer of whatever covering material you use to cover the plane would also work great. Reinforce the holes with something, .016 AL, more dacron, etc. I used some scraps of kevlar to triple the hole thickness for about a half an inch. I think I am at 7 oz, I can't remember if that is painted or unpainted, but I didn't put a lot of paint on it. I have nut plates on most of it, but I might switch to PIP pins for 3 or 4 holes for a quick preflight look.

      Everybody is using at least some fiberglass (canopy fairing) and covering material. Covering scraps are free, A yard of fabric at a local hardware store isn't much, as long as you have some resin left.

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      • #5
        I bet Nev will use Kydex!
        My life feels more complete since I discovered Kydex
        Nev Bailey
        Christchurch, NZ
        Builders-log
        YouTube

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        • #6
          Originally posted by svyolo View Post
          I am using 1 layer of Kevlar (because I have it) but fiberglass is just as good. If you have neither I think A layer of whatever covering material you use to cover the plane would also work great.
          Just for clarity, builders will need access to that area to inspect cables, ELT, fairleads, static ports etc. - a fabric covering would not be an option, unless it was attached to some kind of frame.

          The baggage bulkhead also drums something chronic with front windows open, so you need lots of fasteners to hold the covering in place.

          Comment


          • Mark Dickens
            Mark Dickens commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, I saw Bob recommended that. I don't have a sewing machine...is there anyone out there that offers this as a service? I have very little motivation to begin sewing!

          • JimParker256
            JimParker256 commented
            Editing a comment
            Any local seamstress can probably do it for you. If not, an upholstery shop certainly could. It would take them only a few minutes to do a rectangular pattern. If it were me, I would wait to install the snaps on the canvas until I had the completed cover in hand, and test-fit to the airplane. Being off by 1/8 of an inch with the snap placement would be a royal PITA...

            I had couple of Austin Healey convertibles with snap-on tonneau covers... I don't know if the factory made them "wonky" or they just got that way over time, but it took three men and a big pair of pliers to actually snap all the retaining snaps on those things!

          • svyolo
            svyolo commented
            Editing a comment
            I wouldn't use fabric covering like you cover the plane, just a loose piece.

            I just put nut plates on the tabs, but will switch one corner to PIP pins (or snaps) so I can pull a corner to have a look back easily. I reinforced the holes for the screws with additional layer(s) of material. I didn't want to use a frame as I couldn't pull up a corner quickly and easily.

            Some kind of see thru net would also work I think, but small items could find their way back. depending on the size of the holes.
            Last edited by svyolo; 06-30-2021, 10:41 AM.

        • #7
          A 2 layer carbon laminate weighs just over half what .016 aluminum weighs and is much quieter. Haven't decided whether to clear coat it or leave it bare.

          Comment


          • svyolo
            svyolo commented
            Editing a comment
            I was going to use something like that, but I wanted to be able to pull a corner open to inspect (and I made a separate cargo tube I can mount there if I want) I have it unmounted for now. If it is rigid I have to remove the whole thing, unless I put a door in it.

            I had a piece or kevlar already laminated that was going to use for something else. Easy. I wouldn't hesitate to use Dacron either.

        • #8
          I used the same type of tweed material as is on the seats. It is very porous which no doubt helps with passing cabin air out of the tail. It is secured with velcro, and my mom sewed the cover in around 45 minutes, including adding the velcro.

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          • JimParker256
            JimParker256 commented
            Editing a comment
            Velcro is an excellent solution!

        • #9
          Velcro will likely be a important part of my solution to this. Snaps concerned me because of the potential for shrinkage and just not putting them in the right place. I'll probably go with canvas

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          • #10
            I would caution anyone using Velcro to secure items of mass in the cabin to consider the result if that item comes loose. The last thing that you want is a bulkhead or any other item flying at the back of your head during emergency landing conditions or a crash. The article below describes issues with Velcro degradation when used to secure ELTs, however, the same can be said for any item of mass in the cabin. https://www.faasafety.gov/files/noti...t_hq-12-32.pdf

            I work on special mission transport category aircraft and we have mostly eliminated Velcro in the cabin, exceptions are seat cushions and other light and soft items. Side note: Most varieties of hook and loop fastener burn very well - something else to think about.
            Ryan Anderson
            Ottawa, ON, Canada

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