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  • Fire extinguisher placement

    Would people give me some insight as to where you have mounted your fire extinguishers?

    or better yet where you have remounted them after flying for a bit

    images would help

    thanks Dan

  • #2
    Mine is in the cargo area.
    Standing by with my flak jacket on
    Last edited by Nev; 06-24-2022, 01:20 AM.
    Nev Bailey
    Christchurch, NZ
    Builders-log
    YouTube Bearhawk Blog

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    • #3
      Mine is mounted on the floor forward of the left front seat and behind the control stick, aligned parallel to the wingspan.

      Comment


      • #4
        Mine is mounted under the panel, accessible in flight.
        4D903F30-4DBE-42A2-9AE3-C857F2615537.png
        Mike

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        • #5
          Here's where I mounted mine:

          https://youtu.be/00izZSvW8nQ?t=122
          Last edited by robcaldwell; 06-24-2022, 09:12 AM.
          Rob Caldwell
          Lake Norman Airpark (14A), North Carolina
          EAA Chapter 309
          Model B Quick Build Kit Serial # 11B-24B / 25B
          YouTube Channel: http://bearhawklife.video
          1st Flight May 18, 2021

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          • #6
            An a-b-c extinguisher will rremove all the oxygen if used in your cabin - that’s how it stops combustion. I keep mine in the hanger

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Paul Johnston View Post
              An a-b-c extinguisher will rremove all the oxygen if used in your cabin - that’s how it stops combustion. I keep mine in the hanger
              That's a very pertinent point,

              I'm not sure that a fire extinguisher could be used inside the cabin successfully, particularly inflight. If it's able to put out a fuel or electrical fire, then it's likely to be harmful to the occupants. I like to have a fire extinguisher onboard, more for the risk of a grass fire on starting, or an engine fire on the ground. But it's inside my plastic survival kit where if it accidentally discharged inflight it should be largely contained. I can get to it relatively quickly, but not inflight.
              Last edited by Nev; 06-24-2022, 11:53 PM.
              Nev Bailey
              Christchurch, NZ
              Builders-log
              YouTube Bearhawk Blog

              Comment


              • Paul Johnston
                Paul Johnston commented
                Editing a comment
                That would be ideal in the baggage, as your beyond civilization alot

            • #8
              Mine is up behind the panel by my left knee. It's only held by clamping force from the attachment bracket, so it has come off before during a "heavy" landing (read absolutely stuff up).

              But I want that thing handy if there's a fire in the most likely places, and I want fast access.

              I can hold my breath until I have time to open a window after the discharge.
              I can't pilot effectively while burning....

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              • #9
                Thanks for the responses, having a fire extinguisher mounted is a requirement in Canada

                I am using some of the floor space for a portable Oxygen system ( flying over the Rockies is more comfortable at 14,000 feet)

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                • #10
                  As mentioned earlier, do not use an ABC type extinguisher. You will be blinded and choking on the toxic powder. For aircraft use you need a Halon extinguisher. I just checked the prices, glad I kept mine when I sold my last plane.

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                  • #11
                    Halon for aircraft as Rod said... beside the choking, blinding dry powder issue with ABC, there is the problem of agent+combustion products (not good for humans) and cleaning up after the event... non-trivial. Panel fire with ABC extinguisher? Plan on replacing your glass and anything else that is not dust and gas-sealed (relays, switches, CB's, LRU with fan cooling). Post-use clean-up for Halon is not required beyond the normal detailed inspection of systems required after any fire or smoke-in-cockpit/cabin/bay (soot and effects of high heat, right?) because Halon itself leaves no reside.

                    Halon is one of those hydrocarbons that was judged bad back in the 1970's <edited > , so the Montreal Protocol as updated in the late 1990s mandated a worldwide end to production. These days, all of the Halon agent used by the aviation industry is recycled, and <edit>.

                    Halon is also one of those very slippery gas mixes that likes to slide through otherwise gas-proof connections, so plan on replacing or refilling (by manufacturer if service provided) every 5-8 years IMS (read manufacturer instructions). But don't panic... <edit>
                    In the early days of Halon use, it was not unusual to see reports of crew members thinking the onboard extinguisher (a tiny 2.5 lb or 5 lb portable) was empty because "...nothing came out." That squirt or two of Halon was often enough to extinguish a compartment fire that was otherwise unaffected by one of those huge ABC cart-style ramp extinguishers.
                    Last edited by SpruceForest; 07-03-2022, 10:47 AM. Reason: Prophylactic prevention of personal injury due to excessive mirth.

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                    • #12
                      I was just looking to see if I can purchase Halon in NZ, looks difficult. I came across Carbon Dioxide extinguishers. Does anyone have experience with them for aircraft use?
                      Nev Bailey
                      Christchurch, NZ
                      Builders-log
                      YouTube Bearhawk Blog

                      Comment

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