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Shock Strut Boots

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  • Shock Strut Boots

    I've been exploring options for the boot around the shock struts and found these. Has anyone given these a try and did it work out?

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3YMIVZI0&psc=1

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...KIKX0DER&psc=1

    Or even something like this, trimmed down a bit:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Front-Shock...53.m1438.l2649
    Last edited by alaskabearhawk; 08-02-2019, 06:00 PM.

  • #2
    links are not working

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    • alaskabearhawk
      alaskabearhawk commented
      Editing a comment
      Try it now. Had some issues when the site went down this morning.

  • #3
    I used cheap shifter boots while i looked for something better. The narrow end is positioned and sealed with a zip tie against a small plastic bushing on the threaded shaft of the rod end. It drapes over the upper end of the strut and flares out through the movement hole and is kept in place with an outer flange screwed to the boot cowl. It doesn’t move with the shock but closes out the area sufficiently to prevent fumes etc.

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    • alaskabearhawk
      alaskabearhawk commented
      Editing a comment
      I never thought about inverting the boots. Great idea...wheels are turning!

  • #4
    Mark Goldberg's reply from earlier today that I inadvertently deleted (long story, sorry Mark)
    You could also use the fiberglass fairing that Bob makes. When on the ground it can pull away from the boot cowl sheet metal a little. But in the air it tucks up tight and helps reduce drag from the round tube top of the shock struts. Mark

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    • alaskabearhawk
      alaskabearhawk commented
      Editing a comment
      That's something completely new to me. I just visited his web site and saw the fairings for the Patrol, but didn't see anything for the 4-place. Not really sure how that would work with the movement of the struts though, being solid.

    • jaredyates
      jaredyates commented
      Editing a comment
      When the struts are unloaded, the fairing seals against the belly. On the ground, as the struts extend, there is a gap between the belly and the upper flange of the fairing.

  • #5
    Here is what I did.

    I used the softest CV boot I could find.

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    • alaskabearhawk
      alaskabearhawk commented
      Editing a comment
      That's exactly what I had in mind. Thanks! BTW, what is the make/model of car these came from?

  • #6
    This is what I did, in the end.

    I started out with boots, however I found it was a terrible annoyance and took far too long at annual maintenance time. The metal parts that held them in place also scratched the paint on the shock struts.

    This design allows me to just slip the whole belly panel off in one go. Ideally I would cut it into two pieces so I can remove half at a time, for ease of access. Removing the whole thing at once is a fiddly job. I would always stick with this design of boot.

    When in flight, the gear retract inwards and it all seals up nicely.

    Sorry about the poor photo, I just snapped it on the way past. This engine now leaks a little oil, after it's visit to the shop, whereas new from Bob it didn't lose a drop.
    IMG_20190820_103113.jpg
    Attached Files

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